8 Places to Visit in Your Next Travel to Japan

You just thought about eating sushi and buying electronics. Am I right?

Well, if besides those things you have some free time, I guess you will enjoy our tips. Here is a list of places you might want to visit while you are in Japan (after buying your new mobile phone and eating sushi, of course).

1 – Tokyo

Tokyo is the capital and largest city of Japan. The Greater Tokyo Area is the most populous metropolitan area in the world.

Tokyo offers a seemingly unlimited choice of shopping, entertainment, culture and dining to its visitors. The city’s history can be appreciated in districts such as Asakusa, and in many excellent museums, historic temples and gardens. Contrary to common perception, Tokyo also offers a number of attractive green spaces in the city center and within relatively short train rides at its outskirts.

2 – Kyoto

Kyoto is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million. Formerly the imperial capital of Japan for more than one thousand years, it is now the capital city of Kyoto Prefecture located in the Kansai region, as well as a major part of the Kyoto-Osaka-Kobe metropolitan area. Kyoto is also known as the City of Ten Thousand Shrines.

Over the centuries, Kyoto was destroyed by many wars and fires, but due to its historic value, the city was dropped from the list of target cities for the atomic bomb and spared from air raids during the World War II. Countless temples, shrines and other historically priceless structures survive in the city today.

3 – Nikkō

Nikkō is a city in the mountains of Tochigi Prefecture, Japan. It is a popular destination for Japanese and international tourists. Attractions include the mausoleum of shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu and that of his grandson Iemitsu, and the Futarasan Shrine, which dates to the year 767. There are also many famous hot springs in the area. Elevations range from 200 to 2,000 m. The mountains west of the main city are part of Nikkō National Park and contain some of the country’s most spectacular waterfalls and scenic trails.

The Japanese saying “Never say ‘kekkou’ until you’ve seen Nikko” — kekko meaning beautiful, magnificent or “I am satisfied”—is a reflection of the beauty and sites in Nikkō.

4 – Nara

Nara was the first permanent capital of Japan, established in the year 710 at Heijo. As the influence and political ambitions of the city’s powerful Buddhist monasteries grew to become a serious threat to the government, the capital was moved to Nagaoka in 784.

Eight temples, shrines and ruins in Nara remain: specifically Tōdai-ji, Saidai-ji, Kōfuku-ji, Kasuga Shrine, Gangō-ji, Yakushi-ji, Tōshōdai-ji, and the Heijō Palace, together with Kasugayama Primeval Forest, collectively form “Historic Monuments of Ancient Nara”, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

5 – Kamakura

Kamakura is a city located in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, about 50 kilometres south-south-west of Tokyo. Kamakura was designated as a city on November 3, 1939.

Sometimes called the Kyoto of Eastern Japan, Kamakura offers numerous temples, shrines and other historical monuments. In addition, Kamakura’s sand beaches attract large crowds during the summer months.

6 – Magome

Magome-juku was the forty-third of the sixty-nine stations of the Nakasendō, an ancient road that connected Tokyo and Kyoto. This post town served travelers of the Nakasendo during the Edo Period.

Magome has been beautifully restored with a broad stone walkway lined with tended foliage. It’s embellished preservation contrasts with the rugged authenticity of neighboring Tsumago. The two towns are connected by the Magome-Tsumago Trail, a route which was part of the Nakasendo.

7 – Takayama

Takayama is a city located in Gifu Prefecture, Japan.

Takayama was settled as far back as the Jōmon period. The city is best known for its inhabitants’ expertise in carpentry. It is believed carpenters from Takayama worked on the Imperial Palace in Kyoto and on many of the temples in Kyoto and Nara. Takayama and its culture, as they exist today, took shape at the end of the 16th century, when the Kanamori clan built Takayama Castle. About a hundred years later the city came under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate. However, the high altitude and separation from other areas of Japan kept the area fairly isolated, allowing Takayama to develop its own culture over about a 300-year period.

8 – Mount Fuji

Mount Fuji, located on Honshu Island, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776.24 m. An active stratovolcano that last erupted in 1707–08, Mount Fuji lies about 100 kilometres south-west of Tokyo, and can be seen from there on a clear day. Mount Fuji’s exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is snow-capped several months a year, is a well-known symbol of Japan and it is frequently depicted in art and photographs, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers.

To enjoy Mount Fuji in a more leisurely pace and from a nice natural surrounding, you should head to the Fuji Five Lake (Fujigoko) region at the northern foot of the mountain, or to Hakone, a nearby hot spring resort. Mount Fuji is officially open for climbing during July and August via several routes.

 


Are you going to Japan? Roaming charges are still most notably the biggest hassle for overseas travelers. Fortunately there is a way to get rid of any roaming charges, make and receive unlimited calls from all over the world and even use local mobile number while you are overseas. Want to know more?

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